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98 posts tagged with "Take Action"

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Stop A Massive Clean Water Act Loophole!

A year ago, we warned that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was considering creating a massive loophole in the Clean Water Act. EPA is now moving forward with this and has released an interpretation of the Act that would let known polluters off the hook and even create incentives for companies to pollute more. ...


blue solar panel boards green infrastructure

Tell Congress to invest in true green infrastructure

The floods that sloshed through the Midwest, Texas, and the Great Plains earlier this month were a reminder that climate change, urban sprawl, and wetland destruction have put huge swaths of the U.S. at risk. But even without a $2 trillion deal, there’s much that Congress can do to build infrastructure that’s truly green, infrastructure ...


Save Alaskan Salmon: Say No to Pebble Mine

Waterkeeper Alliance has its roots in fishermen banding together fighting to protect their way of life. Despite efforts to clean up waterways, fisheries worldwide are, for the most part, still declining due to pollution and overfishing. One of the few exceptions to this sad fact is the salmon fishery in Alaska. Once on the verge ...


Musician Josie Dunne Joins Zappos and Sperry to Support Waterkeeper Alliance and Combat the Ocean Plastics Epidemic

Sperry, the iconic footwear brand with a heritage of innovation and love for the sea, and Atlantic recording artist Josie Dunne, known for her personal passion for ocean sustainability, have teamed up with Zappos.com to launch a limited-edition shoe made with BIONIC® yarn, spun from plastic recovered from marine and coastal environments.   Supported by ...


LAST CALL! The Clean Water Act Depends on You

UPDATE: The Trump administration denied our request to extend the WOTUS comment period, giving us only 60 days to express our fierce opposition to this rulemaking that would accelerate the extinction of more than 75 endangered species and remove Clean Water Act protections from millions of miles of waterways. In comparison, the Obama administration provided ...


How the New Trump Rule Would Harm San Francisco Bay

San Francisco Bay’s watershed stretches from the granite tips of the Sierra Nevada to the Golden Gate, covering almost 60,000 square miles and nearly 40 percent of California. Half of California’s surface water supply falls as rain or snow within the watershed, frequently as “ephemeral” or intermittent streams, creeks, and marshes that flow with the ...


Gunpowder Riverkeeper, Blue Water Baltimore, Essex Middle River Civic Council Concerned about ‘Repowering’ of Maryland CP Crane facility

By Gunpowder Riverkeeper and Waterkeeper Alliance Organizer Malaika Elias Gunpowder Riverkeeper has been asking for transparency regarding the Maryland coal-fired power plant for years; its proposed transition to burning natural gas has spurred further involvement from Blue Water Baltimore and community group Essex Middle River Civic Council      The C.P. Crane facility was a coal-fired ...


Interactive Map: How Trump Proposal Endangers Rio Grande Basin

A vast sub-basin of the Rio Grande could lose Clean Water Act protections under Trump proposal The headwaters of the Rio Grande, the nation’s third longest river, are small streams in Colorado’s San Juan Mountains. The river traverses 1,900 miles to the Gulf of Mexico. By swiping and zooming, you can see how a proposed Clean ...


Act Now to Protect Oregon’s Iconic Rogue River

By Stacey Detwiler, conservation director at Rogue Riverkeeper Southwest Oregon’s Rogue is an iconic river, legendary for its whitewater, rugged wilderness, and salmon and steelhead runs. It’s home to some of the most biologically diverse and undeveloped lands in the country. At 5,300 feet, the Rogue begins as a spring bubbling up from the volcanic ...


The Rio Grande Watershed is at its Ecological Breaking Point. Act to Preserve its Clean Water Act Protection

By Rio Grande Waterkeeper Jen Pelz The Rio Grande, the third longest river in the U.S., begins as snowmelt in the high peaks of Colorado’s San Juan Mountains, then traverses 1,900 miles of desert and canyon before joining the waters of the Gulf of Mexico. At least, it used to. Unsustainable water use and climate ...