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54 posts tagged with "Pure Farms Pure Waters"

North Carolina Waterkeepers Mobilize Communities Against Hog Waste

How can a state manage 9.5 billion gallons of hog waste each year? That’s the question North Carolina has been grappling with for more than 20 years. The state, officially, revisits the question every five years, when it renews the Swine Waste Management System General Permit. This permit governs how waste is managed at all ...


New Investigation: Recent Explosion of Poultry Factory Farms in N.C. Piles Manure from 515.3M Chickens Onto Waste From 9.7M Hogs

As State Reviews Standards for Managing Hog Waste, It Must Take Little-Regulated Poultry Waste Into Account North Carolina, a state known for the devastating environmental and public health impacts of industrial-scale hog production, now has more than twice as many poultry factory farms as swine operations, according to a new investigation from the Environmental Working Group and Waterkeeper ...


Under the Radar

New Data Reveals N.C. Regulators Ignored Decade-Long Explosion of Poultry CAFOs By Soren Rundquist, EWG Director of Spatial Analysis and Don Carr, EWG Senior Advisor¹   Although North Carolinians’ attention has rightly been focused on the state’s dense concentration of factory swine farms – concentrated animal feeding operations, or CAFOs, which produce 10 billion gallons ...


Tell the Cooper Administration: Hold Industrial Hog Polluters Accountable

For decades, North Carolina has allowed industrial hog polluters to dump massive amounts of raw hog sewage in open pits, then regularly spray it onto nearby cropland. North Carolina’s hogs generate about 9.5 BILLION gallons of raw sewage every year — and there has been almost no transparency as to how this waste is handled. ...


Communities United: Assateague Coastkeeper Organizes around Community Healthy Air Act

Last spring, Assateague Coastkeeper Kathy Phillips was engulfed in a 16-week losing battle to get the Maryland Senate and House to pass legislation requiring the Maryland Department of the Environment to monitor air emissions from industrial animal agriculture operations and assess their impacts on public health. Now she’s preparing to fight the battle again. Some ...


We Say: Drop the “Swampwaters” Classification of the Lower Cape Fear

According to observable facts, the lower Cape Fear River isn’t a swamp. According to North Carolina’s Environmental Management Commission, however, it is. The Commission in 2015 reclassified a 15-mile stretch of the river flowing past Wilmington, from the segment upstream of Toomers Creek to the line across the river between Lilliput Creek and Snows Cut, ...


Waterkeeper Groups Petition N.C. to Remove “Swamp Waters” Classification from Lower Cape Fear River

Waterkeeper Alliance and Cape Fear River Watch, represented by the Southern Environmental Law Center, petitioned today to remove North Carolina’s “swamp waters” classification from 15 miles of the Lower Cape Fear River flowing past Wilmington. The change would begin a process to reduce upstream pollution in the state’s largest and most industrialized watershed, pollution that ...


How N.C. Can Handle Swine Waste Better

North Carolina is in the process of revising the permit that governs how 9.5 billion gallons of swine waste are handled at more than 2,000 industrial swine operations around the state. Waterkeeper Alliance and the Southern Environmental Law Center yesterday filed extensive comments with the state about how that waste management could be improved. There’s ...


Jury Finds for Smithfield Neighbors

A jury Wednesday found in favor of the neighbors of a North Carolina industrial hog operation, the fourth case in a row the industry in the state has lost. The operation, in Sampson County, is wholly owned by $15 billion Smithfield Foods. Plaintiffs in the case detailed noxious and sickening odor, “dead boxes” stuffed with ...


Tackling E. Coli: Lessons from North Carolina

Waterkeeper groups throughout North Carolina completed a blitz of water sampling this fall, drawing samples in watersheds from the mountains to the coast. Their results illustrate two things: Why the state needs a freshwater standard for E. coli, a dangerous bacteria that can cause life-threatening disease — and the good work a strong Department of ...